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Strategic Network for Sensor Research at Cambridge University

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New Centre for Infrastructure Sensing

last modified Feb 06, 2017 02:58 PM
The University will be receiving 18 million pounds to develop a new national Centre for Infrastructure Sensing on the West Cambridge Site.

The University of Cambridge will receive £18 million in funding to ensure that the UK’s infrastructure is resilient and responsive to environmental and economic impacts. The funding will be used to support  research in the application of advanced sensor technologies to the monitoring  of the UK’s existing and future infrastructure, in order to protect and maintain it.

The funding is part of the wider UK Collaboration for Research in Infrastructure & Cities (UKCRIC), which is a £138 million capital investment that will be centred around the Olympic Park in Stratford and will include 13 university partners from across the UK.

The Cambridge funding will be used to build a National Research Facility for Infrastructure Sensing on the West Cambridge site, which will build upon the expertise of the University’s Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction (CSIC).  The new building will be an interdisciplinary centre for sensors and instrumentation for infrastructure monitoring and assessment, spanning scales from an individual asset, such as a tunnel, building or bridge, to a complex system such as a railway or a city district. More advanced sensors and appropriate data analysis will ensure better product quality, enhanced construction safety, and smarter asset management.

Read more

Impulse entrepreneurship programme

last modified Feb 07, 2017 03:43 PM
The Maxwell Centre is launching a new entrepreneurship programme.

Impulse for tech Innovators, Maxwell Centre

Chance encounter makes amazing ideas possible

Impulse at the Maxwell Centre provides a structured learning experience with tailored mentoring for researchers and aspiring entrepreneurs in turning raw ideas into winning businesses. It serves as a catalyst for entrepreneurship for individuals and organizations.

The Impulse programme is about strong action learning and is results driven, the participants bring their innovative ideas to the table. It acts as a learning vehicle involving prioritising and developing ideas, with a sharp focus on ‘high-potential’ business cases. 

The programme takes place over three months and comprises two three-day intensive residential modules as well as individual assignments. Both online mentoring and regular clinics between the modules are part of the programme and include discussions with senior business professionals. In this way, participants have more time to develop their ideas with the continued help and advice they need. The programme is run in parallel with their normal work activities – there is considerable flexibility about how the aims of the programme can be achieved.

Module A - Preparing a business case:         26-30 June 2017

Module B-  Validating your business case:  25-27 September 2017

More details about the application process, contributors and all other aspects of the programme can be found at the Impulse website or on this leaflet.

IEEE Sensors Letters

last modified Feb 17, 2017 04:38 PM
The IEEE is launching a new peer reviewed rapid publication devoted to sensors and sensing.

IEEE Sensors Letters is a peer-reviewed, online journal devoted to sensors and sensing phenomena.

The fields of interest of the IEEE Sensors Letters are:

  • theory of sensing and senors,
  • sensor design,
  • sensor fabrication and manufacturing,
  • sensor and transducer applications,
  • sensing of physical, chemical and biological phenomena,
  • emphasis on the electronics and physics aspect of sensors and integrated sensors-actuators.

More information, including instructions for authors, can be found on the IEEE Sensors Letters website.

Business creation competition for postdocs

last modified May 04, 2017 04:46 PM
Run by Cambridge Enterprise and the Entrepreneurial Postdocs of Cambridge (EPOC). Win early funding of up to £20k for your business idea.

striking matchIf you are a Cambridge post-doc and interested in starting your own company, then this business creation competition might be for you.

This competition is run by Cambridge Enterprise and the Entrepreneurial Postocs of Cambridge EPOC.

Win £20k or £10k investment to start your company.

To enter, postdocs must submit a business plan outlining their idea. Full details can be found at competition website.

Application deadline 29 June 2017.

New lecturers appointed in the area of sensing

last modified Nov 16, 2017 11:22 PM
Four new lecturers in the area of sensing

Four new lecturers in areas relevant to sensing have been appointed with effect of 1 October 2017.

Department of Engineering

Phillip Stanley-Marbell
University Lecturer in the Internet of Things

p stanley marbell


Phillip and his group work at the interface between the physical world and that of computing systems. A key research interest is to reduce the power consumption of sensors and sensor related devices, such as displays. Prototype hardware is designed, tested and made available open-source.

Ozgur Akan

University Lecturer in the Internet of Things

o akan
Ozgur approaches the Internet of Things from a very different approach to Phillip. Ozgur is interested not only in the Internet of Things but also in naturally occuring networks, using concepts found in nature to solve technical problems. His research includes
  • communications and sensor networks
  • bio-inspired nano, molecular, and neural communications
  • distributed social sensing
  • signal processing and information theory
  • next-generation ICT-inspired health care devices

Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology

Róisín Owens
University Lecturer

r owens
Róisín heads the new Bio-electronic Systems Technologies group in the Department. Her groups is workin at the interface between biology and engineering, e.g. developing biological models and the electronic devices in parallel to improve drug discovery and therapeutics. Róisín and her team are very multidisciplinary with expertise including ranging from biochemistry, microbiology and cell biology on the bio side, to materials science, electronics and chemistry on the physical sciences and engineering side.

Department of Computer Science

Amanda Prorok
University Lecturer
a prorok
Amanda's research interest are multi-robot systems, from algorithms to abstraction. Sensor technologies, of-course,  is key to enable robots to move autonomously, e.g. in a warehouse.

Sensor CDT student wins EPSRC science photo competition

last modified Jun 06, 2019 11:38 AM
Sensor CDT student Peter Pedersen wins 1st prize in the "Citizen Science Abroad" category

Peter Pedersen, a student with the EPSRC Centre of Doctoral Training in Sensor Technologies and Applications, has won the first prize in Citizen Science Abroad category of the EPSRC Science Photography Competition 2019.

cambikesensor alps>

Last year the MRes cohort of the Sensor CDT developed a portable air pollution sensor during their team project. Built around a cheap, yet powerful, microcontroller, the sensor measures particulate matter and stores is together with GPS position and time on an SD card and on a cloud server.

The aim of the project was not only to build the sensor but also to engage the general public in using these sensors on their everyday commute and to build up a picture of air pollution in their city.

air quality

sensor internals

The low-cost, open and modular design enables others to build their own sensors and adapt them to their needs. The students and volunteers took the sensors to different locations around the world, including Europe, Antarctica, South America and Africa. The winning picture was taken on a trip in the Alps during summer 2018.

team

Combining robotics and machine learning for lettuce harvesting

last modified Jul 12, 2019 12:42 PM

The bio-inspired robotics group led by Fumiya Iida has combined machine learning with its robots to advance automated lettuce harvesting.

lettuce machine learning

Lettuces are extremely difficult to harvest automatically. The group has developed the robot over the past few years - from a lab setting into testing in the field.

The robot uses computer vision to identify the lettuces. Machine learning helps the vision system to detect lettuces in different lighting conditions. A specially developed cutting robot then cuts the lettuce at the correct height without crushing them.

lettuce harvest robot crop

Read and view more about this research here.

Reference:
Simon Birrell et al. ‘A Field Tested Robotic Harvesting System for Iceberg Lettuce.’ Journal of Field Robotics (2019). DOI: 10.1002/rob.21888

 

 

New National Research Facility for Infrastructure Sensing in Cambridge

last modified Sep 25, 2019 03:25 PM
The new civil engineering building on the West Cambridge campus has officially opened on 24 Sep 2019. It houses the civil engineering division of the Engineering Department and the state of the art National Research Facility for Infrastructure Sensing

The new Civil Engineering Building, located on the West Cambridge campus, is designed to enable University researchers, industry and other academic institutes to work together on joint research programmes.

The building has twelve world-class, state-of-the-art laboratories focusing on a wide variety of civil engineering disciplines, including sensor development, structures, geomechanics and construction.

In addition it houses the new National Research Facility for Infrastructure Sensing (NRFIS) which is part of the national UK Collaboratorium for Research in Infrastructure and Cities (UKCRIC).

NRFIS will support research in the application of advanced sensor technologies to the monitoring of the UK’s existing and future infrastructure, to provide insights and data to inform the design, construction, operation and management of the UK’s infrastructure and enable better decision-making.

It builds on the University’s track record of delivering innovative sensor advancements through CSIC, the CamBridgeSens research network, and the Centres for Doctoral Training in Sensor Technologies for a Healthy and Sustainable Future (Sensor CDT) and Future Infrastructure and Built Environment: Resilience in a Changing World (FIBE2).

Read more about the new building and the leading academics on the Engineering Department website.

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New National Research Facility for Infrastructure Sensing in Cambridge

Sep 25, 2019

The new civil engineering building on the West Cambridge campus has officially opened on 24 Sep 2019. It houses the civil engineering division of the Engineering Department and the state of the art National Research Facility for Infrastructure Sensing

Sensor CDT student wins EPSRC science photo competition

Jun 06, 2019

Sensor CDT student Peter Pedersen wins 1st prize in the "Citizen Science Abroad" category

View all news