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Strategic Network for Sensor Research

at Cambridge University
 

Biomaker Fayre at the Open Technology Weekopen technology week

The project outcomes of the Biomaker Challenge were demonstrated during the Cambridge Open Technology Week.

More than 30 projects were presented in the Department of Engineering. The outcomes of this challenge were truly exceptional with many working prototypes tackling problems in biology.

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To learn more about the projects, please have a look at the project list.

Prizes were awarded in the categories of best technology, best biology and best maker spirit.

prizesBest technology: A low-cost chromatography system for protein purification by Stéphanie Polderdijk (Cambridge Institute for Medical Research) and Wolfgang Schmied (MRC LMB). column chromatographyThey set out to lower the cost of column chromatography and developed a low-cost and open-source device with inbuilt modularity.

Best biology: PiRMA: A low-cost rodent physiology monitoring bed for pre-clinical experiments by Marcel Gehrung, Dominick McIntyre and Lina Hacker (all from CRUK Cambridge Institute) who came up with a low-cost rodent physiology monitor.

Maker spirit: This category was won by Jennifer Deegan (Department of Plant Sciences) and team Matthew Couchman (John Innes Centre), Tim Deegan (CohoData) and Richard Mortier (Computer Lab) for their DIY focus stacking system for macrophotography of developing ferns.image stacking

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